,

STYLE GURU BIO: Emily Cheng

The prolific fashion genius Yves Saint Laurent once said that “fashions fade, but style is eternal.” For me, a mark of true sartorialist has always been their ability to cultivate a sense of dress that is elegant, classic and eternal—the capacity for their style to withstand the test of time. With the onset of winter in Philadelphia, the changing street style wardrobes are as much an indicator of the chill as the barren trees and the first sight of snowfall. Winter has always been a difficult season to dress for, with the practical urge to don bulky layers of sweats, thermals and parkas often overwhelming the desire to dress well. This semester, I’ll be on the lookout for those mavens who effortlessly mix fashion and function while on campus.

My name is Emily Cheng, and I am delighted to announce that for a third semester, I will be covering the trials and tribulations of balancing school and style at the University of Pennsylvania. Fashion and writing are my main pursuits, and it should come as no surprise to all of you that aside from studying Communication and Consumer Psychology at UPenn, I moonlight as a style columnist for the magazine Time Out Hong Kong, and I also contribute to our premier fashion publication on campus, The WALK, as a stylist and writer. Aside from that, I’ve also developed a passion for marketing and design, working as the Vice President of Marketing at the Penn Fashion Collective, where I lead students in developing multimedia projects around fashion, and giving fashion influencers on campus a platform.

In terms of personal style, I’ve curated an everyday wardrobe that is almost purely monochromatic, with the occasional hints of navy and maroon. Despite Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour’s objections to all-black outfits, I’ve stuck to my firm belief that desaturation is the way to go for a sophisticated ensemble. That said, I’m looking forward to seeing some colorful birds of paradise (metaphorically speaking) on campus this semester to warm up these cold winter months.